CareerGPS

Court Reporters
Summary Occupational Forecast Data for Court Reporters
Employment Employment Change Average Annual Job Openings Wage & Training Levels
2018 2023 Numerical Percent New Jobs Replacement Jobs Total Median Hourly Median Annual Training Levels
313 305 -8 -2.55% -2 25 23 $30.16 $62,742 Postsecondary nondegree award
Description: Use verbatim methods and equipment to capture, store, retrieve, and transcribe pretrial and trial proceedings or other information. Includes stenocaptioners who operate computerized stenographic captioning equipment to provide captions of live or prerecorded broadcasts for hearing-impaired viewers.
Staffing Pattern Data Forecast Data Source: EMSI (2nd Quarter 2018)

Occupation Details

The information in this section represents occupational characteristics included in O*NET which defines key features of an occupation as a standardized, measurable set of variables called "descriptors". These distinguishing characteristics of an occupation are described in greater detail in the O*NET Content Model. All items are listed in descending order of importance.

  • Take notes in shorthand or use a stenotype or shorthand machine that prints letters on a paper tape.
  • Provide transcripts of proceedings upon request of judges, lawyers, or the public.
  • Record verbatim proceedings of courts, legislative assemblies, committee meetings, and other proceedings, using computerized recording equipment, electronic stenograph machines, or stenomasks.
  • Transcribe recorded proceedings in accordance with established formats.
  • Ask speakers to clarify inaudible statements.
  • File a legible transcript of records of a court case with the court clerk's office.
  • File and store shorthand notes of court session.
  • Respond to requests during court sessions to read portions of the proceedings already recorded.
  • Record depositions and other proceedings for attorneys.
  • Verify accuracy of transcripts by checking copies against original records of proceedings and accuracy of rulings by checking with judges.
  • Record symbols on computer storage media and use computer aided transcription to translate and display them as text.

Knowledge

99%
English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
95%
Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
82%
Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
75%
Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
69%
Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Skills

62%
Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
60%
Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
56%
Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
53%
Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
53%
Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
50%
Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Abilities

85%
Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
72%
Speech Recognition - The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
69%
Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
69%
Selective Attention - The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
69%
Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
66%
Written Comprehension - The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
62%
Written Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
56%
Information Ordering - The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
50%
Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
50%
Finger Dexterity - The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
50%
Control Precision - The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
50%
Speech Clarity - The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.

Work Activities

97%
Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
86%
Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
79%
Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
77%
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
70%
Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
65%
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
65%
Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.
61%
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
56%
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
54%
Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
51%
Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.
50%
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
50%
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
Title Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed
Overall Experience Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.
Job Training Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include food service managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, interviewers, and insurance sales agents.
Education Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Interests

Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Work Styles

Dependability - Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail - Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity - Job requires being honest and ethical.
Achievement/Effort - Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Initiative - Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Stress Tolerance - Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Persistence - Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Independence - Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Adaptability/Flexibility - Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Self Control - Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Cooperation - Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Work Values

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