CareerGPS

Hunters and Trappers
Summary Occupational Forecast Data for Hunters and Trappers
Employment Employment Change Average Annual Job Openings Wage & Training Levels
2018 2023 Numerical Percent New Jobs Replacement Jobs Total Median Hourly Median Annual Training Levels
45 46 2 3.53% 0 4 5 $18.04 $37,529 No formal educational credential
Description: Hunt and trap wild animals for human consumption, fur, feed, bait, or other purposes.
Staffing Pattern Data Forecast Data Source: EMSI (2nd Quarter 2018)

Occupation Details

The information in this section represents occupational characteristics included in O*NET which defines key features of an occupation as a standardized, measurable set of variables called "descriptors". These distinguishing characteristics of an occupation are described in greater detail in the O*NET Content Model. All items are listed in descending order of importance.

  • Maintain and repair trapping equipment.
  • Patrol trap lines or nets to inspect settings, remove catch, and reset or relocate traps.
  • Obtain required approvals for using poisons or traps, and notify persons in areas where traps and poison are set.
  • Trap and capture quarry dead or alive for identification, relocation, or sale, using baited, scented, or camouflaged traps, snares, cages, or nets.
  • Scrape fat, blubber, or flesh from skin-sides of pelts with knives or hand scrapers.
  • Kill or stun trapped quarry, using clubs, poisons, guns, or drowning methods.
  • Select, bait, and set traps, and lay poison along trails, according to species, size, habits, and environs of birds or animals and reasons for trapping them.
  • Skin quarry, using knives, and stretch pelts on frames to be cured.
  • Travel on foot, or by using vehicles or equipment such as boats, snowmobiles, helicopters, snowshoes, or skis to reach hunting areas.
  • Track animals by checking for signs such as droppings or destruction of vegetation.
  • Pack pelts in containers, load containers onto trucks, and transport pelts to processing plants or to public auctions.
  • Participate in animal damage control, wildlife management, disease control, and research activities.
  • Teach or guide individuals or groups unfamiliar with specific hunting methods or types of prey.
  • Wash and sort pelts according to species, color, and quality.
  • Mix baits for attracting animals.
  • Decide where to set traps, using grid maps and aerial maps of hunting areas.

Knowledge

62%
Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
57%
Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
56%
Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
55%
Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

60%
Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
50%
Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
50%
Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
50%
Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

Abilities

66%
Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
66%
Arm-Hand Steadiness - The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
62%
Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
62%
Inductive Reasoning - The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
62%
Multilimb Coordination - The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
60%
Far Vision - The ability to see details at a distance.
60%
Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
56%
Manual Dexterity - The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
56%
Trunk Strength - The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
56%
Flexibility of Closure - The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.
56%
Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
56%
Finger Dexterity - The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
53%
Control Precision - The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
53%
Selective Attention - The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
53%
Category Flexibility - The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
50%
Visualization - The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
50%
Spatial Orientation - The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
50%
Extent Flexibility - The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
50%
Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.

Work Activities

83%
Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
77%
Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
75%
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment - Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
69%
Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
67%
Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
65%
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
64%
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment - Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
63%
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
63%
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
62%
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
61%
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
60%
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
60%
Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
56%
Monitoring and Controlling Resources - Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
53%
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
52%
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
52%
Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
Title Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed
Overall Experience Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
Job Zone Examples These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include taxi drivers, amusement and recreation attendants, counter and rental clerks, construction laborers, continuous mining machine operators, and waiters/waitresses.
Education Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.

Interests

Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outsi

Work Styles

Independence - Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Dependability - Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail - Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity - Job requires being honest and ethical.
Persistence - Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Initiative - Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Analytical Thinking - Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Innovation - Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Achievement/Effort - Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.

Work Values

Independence - Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.